Yvonne deSousa guest post

We couldn’t be more excited to introduce you all to our incredibly talented (and hilarious!) blogging friend Yvonne DeSousa! It truly is our pleasure to feature a guest post from her on our blog. We connected with Yvonne through Twitter, where we soon learned more about her blog (yvonndesousa.com) and her recently released book (“MS Madness! A ‘Giggle More, Cry Less Story of Multiple Sclerosis’”). Such great writing and we encourage you all to check them out soon!  Thank you, Yvonne, and to our readers: Get ready to giggle and learn more about one of the many...

An MS caregiver’s cry revisited: T...

As I sat out in the living room reading my book for graduate school, I heard Jennifer back in the bedroom crying in pain. The damn trigeminal neuralgia had woken her from her nap. It’s the sharp nerve pain for which she just wrote about in a guest post on MSlisaSAYS that appeared later in the afternoon. I went back to comfort my pain-stricken wife, known that my presence was the only thing I could provide for this situation. Like Jennifer, I too felt totally helpless. And so, all could do is kneel at her bedside, hold her hand, and curse the disease for being so...

The Blame Game

As I was reading at the dining room table, I heard a car and then my husband’s voice. “Strange,” I thought. “Maybe Dan ran into someone he knew while he was out on his run.” So I kept reading, only to be horrified when I saw Dan walk in the front door. His right eye socket, left hand and knee and white wicking running shirt all were covered in blood. “Oh, no,” I cried. “Oh, no. Dan, what happened?” Dan dabbed his eye with the blood-soaked blue napkin he received from the kind stranger who gave him a ride home. He was trying to calm himself and me down...

I’ve been thinking…

I spent a large part of my summer thinking and learning about disability. Sounds silly right? After all, I shouldn’t need to learn about disability since I live it—having relied on a wheelchair for the last ten years, but now I see disability differently. I better understand the societal, financial, and political realities of having a disability. Plus, I know that there is more to disability than not being able to walk. Disability includes many other deficits, be that hearing, vision, or cognition. And I realize this not only because of my graduate classes at CMU...

Not today

I think I don’t want to have MS today. I don’t want to take my injection today, because really, are you sure it is anything more than glorified water? And I’m tired of asking for help all of the time. “Will you help me in the bathroom?” or “Will you drive me to the store?” or “Can you help me get dressed?” Because that is what my MS has done to me… turned me into a grown-up child. And today, I’ve decided I don’t want to deal with it. I just want my life, my future, my dignity, and my privacy back, which means I don’t want MS today. Truth be told,...